Pub Rants

A Very Nice Literary Agent Indulges in Polite Rants About Queries, Writers, and the Publishing Industry

Tagged San Diego Comic Con

Anatomy of A Query Rejection

This June, I taught a query workshop at Lighthouse Writers Workshop’s Lit Fest. Afterward, one participant approached and asked me to read a response letter she had received (not from me). She wanted to know if it was a “standard” rejection letter. I read it aloud and was a little chagrined to discover just how similar it was to the letter I had been using for years. I told her that yes, this was not a personal letter but a standard rejection. Two days later, I was chastised by an aspiring writer who said it was time for us to change our standard rejection letter. Obviously that poor person had received our letter multiple times.

But I took the chastisement to heart. It was time for a change. So I’m going to share with you, my newsletter readers, our standard rejection letter and explain why I chose the verbiage I did.

Dear INSERT WRITER’S NAME:

KN: I actually do input the writer’s name. This business is so impersonal (some agents don’t even respond at all if they aren’t interested in a query), but I always want writers to be acknowledged as human beings. Even though it takes longer to respond to queries.

Thank you so much for thinking of me for your query. I wish I could offer a more personalized response but on average, I receive 500+ email query letters a week.

KN: This is true. In fact, I receive way more than 500 queries a week. Recently I’ve been averaging about 100 to 150 email query letters a day. Don’t let these stats daunt you. If you are serious about your career, you’ll persevere. Know the odds, but give them only the weight of a side note. I have signed many a client after finding them in our query inbox.

Do know that every query letter and sample page is read, and even though your project is not right for me, it might be right for another agent so don’t give up!

KN: This is true. I actually read a lot of my own queries on a daily basis. However, when I travel or have a crazy day, Angie, Jamie, and Karrie jump in to help out. They have to. After just two days, the inbox grows unwieldy. I also really do mean the last line. I’ve passed on any number of queries for projects that weren’t right for me but that other agents loved and went on to represent and even sell. I can only champion what I feel passionate about. Not everything will be a good fit for me. 

I’m also sorry I have no agent recommendations to offer.

KN: I had to include this. We were receiving so many reply emails asking for a recommendation that it was taking too long to respond to every query twice. We had to preemptively make it clear that we could offer no more information. 

Good luck with all your publishing endeavors.

KN: Absolutely. My rejection letter to your query is only one little bump on your journey to becoming a published author. 

Sincerely,

Kristin Nelson


San Diego Comic Con – The Latest Shiny Promotional Venue

STATUS: The problem with summer is that I’d rather not work long hours. Too much sunshine and lovely outdoor weather.

What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now?  TONGUE TIED by GroupLove

There is no doubt in my mind that Comic Con in San Diego is the shiny new conference that all writers want to attend. I get it. It’s a blast. Geek Chic. Fandom over great shows like True Blood and Game of Thrones. Honest to goodness movie stars. Fabulous parties (I’m still lamenting that I didn’t get to go to the Entertainment Weekly one.)

What’s not to like? You can even buy some funny, cool, and geek insider T-Shirts.

But is it necessarily the best promotional venue for a writer?

Jury might still be out on that but here’s my thinking. If your book has an obvious connection to the fan base that attends, I’d say yes, it’s a worthwhile promotional venue for an author.

Gail Carriger is a great example. She writes steampunk fantasy and also has a graphic novel equivalent of her popular The Parasol Protectorate series.

Her publisher, Orbit, had a full-size paper cut-out of graphic novel Alexia Tarabotti in their booth. Here I am standing with it. 

And fans even come dressed up as Gail’s characters for her autograph signings.

I can safely say that her fan base is present at this Con in full force.

Same would hold true for Marie Lu and her Legend Trilogy. Since there is a video game in the works below is a sneak peek), she had lots of fans at this event.

As an author, ask yourself. Do fans who love my books love all things geek that can be found at San Diego Comic Con? If the answer is yes, then this shiny venue is a good fit. If it’s not, I wouldn’t recommend it even though it’s the latest “hot” thing.


2012 San Diego Comic Con – Part III

STATUS: Loved seeing so many NLA clients represented there!

Kristen Callihan’s sequel to FIRELIGHT!


The hilarious moment when we realized that Emily from the Penguin group looked exactly like the model on Sara’s client Michael Underwood’s Geekomancy cover!



And Friends Don’t Let Friends date vampires!! Lots of buzz in the HarperCollins booth for Sarah Rees Brennan!




2012 San Diego Comic Con – Part III

STATUS: The best part of comic con!
What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now? nothing as I’m heading out. 

Getting into the Firefly panel!
And standing under the 50 foot Hall banner for Marie Lu’s Legend! (Yes, I’m the tiny figure under it.)


2012 San Diego Comic Con – Part II

STATUS: Heading out the door in 15 minutes. I’m doing the interview for Spotlight on Gail Carriger!
What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now? SOMEONE LIKE YOU by Adele
Gail Carriger and I –washed in color at the Hilton Bayfront. 
Sara’s client Jason Hough and his Del Rey Editor Michael Braff
Gail right after her Witty Women in Steampunk panel. 

2012 San Diego Comic con

STATUS: Love reliable internet access! It’s been a little spotty from the floor.

What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now? VERTIGO by U2

Finally getting a chance to upload some pics!

Shot of show floor from above and the Walking Dead booth!


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